Fighting Inflammation

I was so thankful for Bromelain yesterday- still am, actually.  But then I learned that Bromelain and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be discontinued about two weeks before any surgical procedure to reduce the risk of post-operative bleeding.  And since I have surgery in my near future, I have discontinued my Bromelain.  I miss it already!

I quickly consulted my essential oil books and mixed up a blend of inflammation-fighters.  Here’s my recipe…

Anti-Inflammatory Essential Oil BlendOils for Inflammation.jpg

Combine the following oils in an amber glass bottle:

I took my blend to my physical terrorist therapist who used the oils during my session this morning.  (I can’t take the credit for that PT insult.  I overheard it at therapy today!)

While I can’t address inflammation with a supplement, I’m glad to be able to address it with essential oils.  How do YOU fight inflammation?

Of Pain and Torture, AKA Physical Therapy

bromelain and iceIf a picture paints a thousand words, what story does this picture tell?  I’ll give you a hint:  PT.  Physical Therapy, otherwise known as Pain and Torture.

⇦These are the things my physical therapist told me to do four times a day:  exercise, ice and anti-inflammatory.

My anti-inflammatory of choice is Bromelain, a mixture of enzymes found in pineapples.  These protein-digesting enzymes block the body’s production of compounds that cause swelling and pain.  The suggested dosage of Bromelain as a digestive aid is 500 mg per day, taken with a meal.  But for an injury or for arthritis, up to 2000 mg on an empty stomach is recommended.

I began taking 500 mg of Bromelain a day and didn’t notice much improvement.  But when I bumped up to 2,000 mg, my pain level was remarkably reduced, and my inflammation began to lessen at a much more noticeable rate.

Even though I started this post with a PT insult, to be fair and completely honest, I’m extremely pleased with the therapy I’ve received.  If you need a physical therapist in the Birmingham area, I can recommend an excellent one!  And if you’re looking for a natural anti-inflammatory, you just found it!

Important:  Because bromelain breaks down fibrin, a blood-clotting protein that can impede blood circulation, individuals on blood-thinning medication or with bleeding disorders, high blood pressure, liver disease, or kidney disease should contact their healthcare provider before taking bromelain.  Bromelain should not be taken with tetracycline or by individuals who are allergic to pineapple.  Bromelain and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDs) should be discontinued 1 to 2 weeks before any surgical procedure to reduce the risk of post-operative bleeding.

Digestive Enzymes

Did you know that every time you eat, enzymes go to work to break down the food you eat so that your body can use the nutrients in your food?  Did you know that when your diet includes foods that are high in enzymes, you are sparing your pancreas from having to continually manufacture enzymes?  If you answered, “yes,” you know more than I did before I started reading Nourishing Traditions!

Nourishing Traditions, Sally Fallon

I’ve recently learned that eating enzyme-rich foods ought to be a part of my diet.  The enzymes in raw food help to start the digestion process and reduce the body’s need to produce digestive enzymes.  When my diet is composed primarily of cooked food, I’m putting a severe strain on my pancreas.

Sally Fallon, author of Nourishing Traditions writes,

If the pancreas is constantly overstimulated to produce enzymes that ought to be in foods, the result over time will be inhibited function.  Humans eating an enzyme-poor diet, composed primarily of cooked food, use up a tremendous amount of their enzyme potential in the outpouring of secretions from the pancreas and other digestive organs.

So, what are enzyme-rich foods?  The ones I’m attempting to add to my diet are extra virgin olive oil, raw honey, grapes, bananas, and pineapple.  I’m also supplementing with Beeyoutiful’s Digestive Enzyme.

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Digestive Enzyme contains betaine HCl (from beets and molasses), pancreatin, amylase, protease, lipase, papain, cellulose, ox bile extract, bromelain (from pineapple), and papaya powder.

I’d love to hear from you if you have something to share about moving from an enzyme-poor diet to an enzyme-rich one!  What raw foods do you eat?  I can’t wait to read your comments!

Natural Anti-Inflammatory: Bromelain

Bromelain (blog)Did you spot this product in my Beeyoutiful pantry yesterday?  (I’m visualizing Where’s Waldo fans revisiting yesterday’s post to find it!)  Well, I’ll just tell you it was tucked in between the Tummy Tuneup and the CoQ10.  And it really doesn’t matter where it is in my pantry.  If you’re dealing with inflammation from a sports injury or trauma or even arthritis, you might just want to add some Bromelain to your pantry.

Bromelain is naturally found in pineapple, and it works by blocking metabolites that accelerate and worsen the inflammatory process.

Bromelain is a group of powerful protein-digesting enzymes which block the body’s production of compounds that cause swelling and pain.  Once inflammation is reduced, blood can move more easily to a traumatized or irritated area to ease pain and speed healing.

Click here to order Bromelain

Important:  Because bromelain breaks down fibrin, a blood-clotting protein that can impede blood circulation, individuals on blood-thinning medication or with bleeding disorders, high blood pressure, liver disease, or kidney disease should contact their healthcare provider before taking bromelain.  Bromelain should not be taken with tetracycline or by individuals who are allergic to pineapple.